Schedule

Common Day of Learning 2016 takes place Tuesday, February 23.

The full schedule is also available on the APU Mobile app.

9:30-10:45 a.m. Session One
Duke Classrooms
11 a.m.-12 p.m. Chapel and Keynote Address
Felix Event Center
12-1 p.m. Lunch
Kresge Plaza and Heritage Court
1-2:15 p.m. Session Two
Duke and Darling Classrooms
2:30-3:45 p.m. Session Three
Duke and Darling Classrooms

Note: Poster sessions will be ongoing throughout the day in the Duke lobby, and are included in the list below as running from 9:30 a.m.-3:45 p.m.

Sessions

Tuesday, February 23

9:30 a.m.
Addressing Depression among Older Adults: Can Supportive Visits from Social Workers Help?***

Psalms Rojas, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

***Second place at undergraduate social work BPD conference, 2015

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Allowing Caregivers to be Known: Ethnic and Gender Disparities in the Utilization of Respite Services

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Genevieve Virden, undergraduate student, Social Work

The American population is aging. Research indicates that an increasing number of family members will be stepping into a caregiving role, thus taking on a significant amount of the caregiving burden. To support the growing number of caregivers, respite services were created in order to give caregivers a much-needed break for times of self-care. Recent studies indicate there are disparities in the use of respite services based on a caregiver’s gender and race/ethnicity. Data collected at a local agency examines the rate of utilization of respite services by race/ethnicity and gender in the San Gabriel Valley. It is hoped that the findings of this study foster conversations on potential racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the use of respite care among caregivers. The study will also discuss broader implications for social work practice in terms of promoting the use of respite services as well as developing more culturally and gender-relevant services.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Aspergillus Sclerotiorum Entomopathogenic Fungus is Able to be Transmitted from Infected to Uninfected Subterranean Termites in

Tyler S. Laird, Biochemistry

Sarah Richart, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
At the Heart of Morality Lies Neuro-visceral Integration: Lower Cardiac Vagal Tone Predicts Utilitarian Moral Judgment

Matthew Kriege, Psychology

Gewnhi Park, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Case Closed: Addressing Factors Associated with Premature Termination at a Domestic Violence Agency

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Chelsea Heath, undergraduate student, Social Work

Victims of domestic violence often face severe emotional, financial, and mental distress, which drastically limits their abilities to find a job and provide for their family. Research shows counseling and case management provide a safe avenue for domestic violence victims to begin the healing process. However, obstacles often prevent clients from utilizing agency-provided therapy, and cases are closed prematurely either by the client or the agency, resulting in what are considered “unsuccessful terminations.” Data collected at a local agency examines the overwhelming factors associated with premature or unsuccessful termination. Findings from this study will inform professionals of factors impeding the ability to utilize therapy and thereby reduce the number of unsuccessful terminations and provide a more holistic level of care.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Celebrating Excellence in Undergraduate Research: Winning Entries from the Eighth Annual Honors Paper Competition

 David Weeks, Ph.D., Dean, Honors College

Rachel Roller, undergraduate student, Honors Humanities and Chemistry   Lauren Lamb, undergraduate student, English

Authors of the essays published in the eighth annual honors paper competition will present their essays and engage in an open question-and-answer session with the audience. Each author receives a monetary prize toward building their personal library, and six copies of the Honors College journal, Gratia Eruditionis.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Celebrating Undergraduate Research

 Azusa Pacific undergraduate students and faculty mentors will be on hand throughout the day to discuss their scholarly investigations in this professional poster session led by Kevin S. Huang, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Biology and Chemistry and director of undergraduate research. During the 2014-15 academic year, more than 50 undergraduate students disseminated research results at professional conferences, some of which resulted in awards.

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Changes in Middle Cerebral Artery Flow Velocity during Acute Moderate Exercise

Corinna Gisinger, Psychology

Lauren Penilla, Psychology

Roxana Valles, Biology

Samantha Douglas, Psychology

Scott Wood, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Communication Vitamins for a Healthy Relationship: How to Prevent the Infection of Divorce

Ryan Montague, Ph.D., Department of Communication Studies

All couples (dating, engaged, or married) can do preventative care for their relationship to fight off negative communication viruses that might attack and break down their relational health. This is based on Dr. John Gottman’s key indicators that have been used to predict divorce with more than 90% accuracy. The bright side is that Gottman provides a positive antidote for each negative predictor. In this presentation, you will learn to identify the predictors of divorce and how to replace those negative traits with positive ones that could ultimately save your relationship.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Cultivating Resiliency in At-risk Latino Continuation High School Students: How Effective is Evidence-based Group Therapy?

Latino adolescents are more subject to mental health disorders and symptoms than their Caucasian counterparts. One in five Latino teens in the United States has considered or attempted suicide, double the rate of Caucasian adolescents, and research finds that suicide is the third-leading cause of death among Latino teens. This research will examine the effectiveness of schoolbased group counseling in reducing the number of mental illness symptoms among high school Latino students as identified by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) mental health screening tool used at a continuation high school. The SDQ is also used as a tool to cultivate resiliency among Latino adolescents by addressing the mental health symptoms identified through the questionnaire. Findings from this study will inform professionals of how school-based mental health services can be a valuable approach in detecting and addressing mental health difficulties among Latino adolescents.

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work Lindsey Shafto, undergraduate student, Social Work

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Determining the Effect of Endogenous PD-1 Expression on the Costimulatory Potential of the PD1:CD28 Chimera

Megan Keys, Biology

Megan Prosser, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
DNA-templated Synthesis of Macrocycles

Kaiah Luecke, Biochemistry

Cyndi Reck, Allied Health

Emily Burchinal, Allied Health

Silas Griffin, Biochemistry

Jeremy Hitchcock, Biochemistry

Kevin Huang, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Does Early Social Work Intervention Decrease Patient Length of Stay Following Elderly Orthopedic Hip Surgery?

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Stephanie Nimatuj, undergraduate student, Social Work

Cassandra Threadgill, undergraduate student, Social Work

In the United States, around 350,000 cases of hip fractures occur yearly among patients age 65 and older, and there is an expected increase in this type of hospitalization. Data collected from two local hospitals examines if there is a correlation between early social work intervention and length of stay among patients 65 or older with hip fractures. Early social work intervention is defined as any form of interaction between the social worker and patient 48 hours postsurgery and includes interviews/assessments and supportive visits, as these are often credited with decreases in a patient’s length of stay. Every day a patient is hospitalized, there is an increase in costs for patient and hospital; therefore, hospitals aim to minimize length of stay while providing a safe discharge. Findings will assess the effectiveness of these early social work interventions in reducing patients’ length of stay in the hospital.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Educating Latino Parents About Autism: How Effective are Group Parent Training Classes?**

Eliana Tarazon, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

**First place at undergraduate social work BPD conference, 2015

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Effectiveness of Individual Counseling for Undergraduate Students on Academic Probation

Hazelle Tanag, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Effects of Electro-cortical Stimulation on Spatial Cognition

Hailey Trier, Psychology

Scott Wood, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Effects of Familial vs. Organizational Referral on Reduction of Aggressive Tendencies in School-age Boys with Oppositional Defia

 Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Christine Reynolds, undergraduate student, Social Work

Approximately 11% of all boys are diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), which is characterized by verbal and physical aggression and is one of the most common childhood behavior disorders. Current research suggests that parental involvement in therapy for boys ages 6-12 diagnosed with ODD produces longer-lasting results than therapy of children without any parental involvement. Referrals to mental health agencies can be made either by caregivers/ immediate family (internally) or by school or child protective services (externally). This study examines if there is a correlation between type of referral (internal vs. external) and the reduction in the number of aggressive outbursts at school and home after one year of therapy. Findings will inform professionals if type of referral has any impact on treatment outcomes, suggesting implications for the extent to which clinicians should involve family in the treatment.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Effects of Histone Methyltransferase Inhibition on Planarian Regeneration

Rebecca Allen, Biochemistry

Cristian Aguilar, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Effects of Psycho-education on Clinician Attitudes Toward the Wellness Recovery Model

Danielle Patterson, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Exploring Satisfaction with Bereavement Services in a Hospice Setting

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Amanda Livingston, undergraduate student, Social Work

Data collected at a hospice agency examines caregivers’ satisfaction with the end-of-life services provided to the patient and the family members. Presenters will discuss the medical and emotional support provided by hospice staff while the patient was living, as well as the continued support for family members after the patient has passed. This study will also examine how the caregivers’ level of satisfaction with bereavement services varies based on patient service location (home versus assisted living facility). This will inform professionals of the potential differences in level of satisfaction between clients based on service location, and allow them to adjust services to ensure the highest quality of care to all patient family members.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Exploring the Factor Structure of a Recovery Assessment Measure among Substance-abusing Youth

Samantha B. Douglas, Psychology

Rachel Castaneda, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Fulbright Voices: A Living Letter from Slovakia

John Simons, DMA, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, College of Music and the Arts

Craig Goodworth, MFA ’10

Craig Goodworth, MFA ’10, will share his experiences as a Fulbright research scholar to the Slovak Republic. Goodworth produced an art exhibit, studied honeybees and mead production, and took part in traditional hunting expeditions in the land of his ancestors. This is the first session of three in the “Fulbright Voices” series. 

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Hypersocial Behavior in Mice Associated with the Heterozygous Deletion of GTF2i, a Gene Deleted in Williams Beuren Syndrome and

Cassandra Liew, Biology

Loren Martin, Ph.D., Department of Graduate Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Inhibition of DNA Methylation Blocks Basal Lamina Formation during Wound Healing in Ambystoma Mexicanum

Andrew McLain, Biochemistry

Osinachi DomNwachukwu, Biochemistry

Cristian Aguilar, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
In the Shadows of Dogwoods and Spires: Reflections of a High Sierra and Oxford Semester Alumna

Sara Flores, undergraduate student, English 

At High Sierra, I began my personal metamorphosis from achievement-driven high school honors student to truth-seeking scholar. That first semester set an incredible precedent for the rest of my time at APU and helped prepare me for studying at Oxford. As an English Literature major, I saw Oxford as the Holy Grail of study abroad programs and longed to learn where some of my favorite authors lived and wrote. My semester at Oxford was truly a gift, as were my two semesters at High Sierra. Both programs offer students the opportunity to be affected deeply, not only by the material they study but also by their unique locations and communities. I am forever grateful to have experienced living and learning in new places that I now call home.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Is Graduate School the Right Next Step for Your Future?

Joseph Bentz, Ph.D., Pew College Society/Department of English

Brian Eck, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

Steven Syverson, Senior Director, Graduate and Professional Admissions

Thomas Eng, Center for Career and Calling

In fields as widely varying as psychology, medicine, theology, law, nursing, and others, many students will need not only the undergraduate education they are receiving at APU, but also graduate education in order to pursue their goals. This session, sponsored by the Pew College Society, an organization dedicated to helping good students get into graduate school, will answer questions as widely varying as: Is graduate school necessary for me? If so, how soon should I go? How do I choose a school? How do I get in? How soon should I start? How will I pay for it?

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Letters from the Lives of Homeless Veterans: Addressing the Relationship between Barriers and Length of Time Required to Move in

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Rachel Adamson, undergraduate student, Social Work 

Veterans are four times more likely to become homeless than their nonveteran counterparts. Research shows that more than 30% of the homeless population has served in the armed forces. Veterans are less likely to ask for help, therefore as a society we have a responsibility to care for these individuals who have served the country. The United States can rewrite the endings for many veterans who fight homelessness. In order to understand what needs to be rewritten, we must analyze the barriers our veterans face. The purpose of this study is to discover the relationship between the types of barriers and the length of time it takes to find permanent housing for veterans. The research team will present data collected at a nonprofit organization in San Bernardino County that houses homeless veterans. This data will be helpful to social workers providing services for programs that will best meet veteran housing needs.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions

Chris Cain, Mathematics

Bradley “Peanut” McCoy, Ph.D., Department of Mathematics and Physics

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Nonlinguistic Cultural Cues Moderate the Accessibility of Spanish in Bilingual Latino-Americans

Hyun (Hannah) Seo Lee, Psychology

Natalie Koskela, Psychology

Benjamin Marsh, Ph.D., Department of Psychology 

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Nonverbal Truth: Discovering How Much Truth is Really in the Pop Culture Articles We Read

Marcia Berry, Ph.D., Department of Communication Studies

Presenters TBD

So often we read pop culture articles that promise to reveal the secrets of successful relationships, interviews, or appearances. Students from the Nonverbal Communication class will share the results of their research into the truth as presented in pop culture and the truth as presented in academia. Come hear the top papers from this class and be in the know! 

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Overexpression of GFP-tagged KAP3 in Cell Culture Shows Specific Subcellular Localization Patterns and Effects on the Actin Cyto

James Macatangay, Biochemistry

Corey Morales, Biochemistry

Matthew Berezuk, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Psychosocial Service Use by Ethnic Minorities in Hospice*

Taylor Henderson, Social Work

Lauren McNair, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

*First place at undergraduate social work BPD conference, 2014

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Student Involvement in Faculty Research: Opportunities for Career Development, for Graduate School and Beyond

 Kathryn Ecklund, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

Ashley Horiuchi, undergraduate student, Psychology

Gabriel Lee ’14, Psychology

Olivia Painter, undergraduate student, Psychology

Melanie Petersen, undergraduate student, Psychology

This interactive panel discussion will introduce participants to the process of being mentored by faculty in research through participation in faculty’s professional scholarship program. Participants will have the opportunity to consider the academic, vocational, and professional benefits that derive from being mentored by faculty through this venue. Panelists will share their learning processes and beneficial outcomes. Participants will have the opportunity to dialogue with panelists regarding how to initiate the process of getting mentored in faculty research, and what expectations they can form for such a relationship.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Synthesis and Characterization of [cis-Co(en)2Cl(imid)]2Fe(NO)23+

Brian M. Enzenauer, Chemistry

Jennifer Young, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Synthesis of Amino-acid-based N-heterocyclic Carbene Ligand Precursors

Alicia Hughes, Chemistry

Jacqueline Janowicz, Chemistry

Jennifer Young, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Synthesis of an N-heterocyclic Carbene Pincer Type Ligand Using the Amino Acid Glycine

Bridget K. Kawamala, Biochemistry

Jennifer Young, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
The Effect of Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Nitrogen Deficiency on Morphological and Physiological Characteristics o

Karina Morales, Biochemistry

Russell Mellen, Biology

Hiroki Ikawa, Ph.D., National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, Japan

Charles P. Chen, Ph.D., Department of Biology and Chemistry

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
The Effects of Health Status on Financial Portfolio Choice

Brian Baker, Economics

Elwin Tobing, Ph.D., School of Business and Management

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
The Effects of Moderate Acute Exercise on Cognitive Performance

Madison Hybl, Psychology

Samantha Douglas, Psychology

Scott Wood, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
The Kids Aren’t All Right: Looking Out for the Next Generation

Monica Ganas, Ph.D., Department of Theater Arts

Breanna Bingham, undergraduate student, Acting for the Stage and Screen

Marcus Escalera, undergraduate student, Sociology

Michaela Summers, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

Matthew Tyrell, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

As arts programs have been steadily disappearing from our schools, despite the compelling data arguing for them, technology and media use have been steadily rising—in and out of school. The result is that students are often warehoused in front of screens, consuming the stories, images, information, values, even the experiences and skills, of others rather than being taught and encouraged to create their own. This panel will explore these issues with the audience from a number of perspectives, and propose measures that might make the future brighter for everyone.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
The Role of Sociocultural Variables on the Health Care Services Utilization of Latinos

Rebekah Guerra, Psychology

Priscila Diaz, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Uncommon Learning for the Common Good

Rhonda M. McEwen, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, University College

Wayne Herman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, University College

Brant Himes, Ph.D., Curriculum Specialist/Faculty,

University College University College promotes “uncommon learning” by providing alternative education pathways for the ever-growing adult learner population. Our online and blended-learning modalities demand innovative approaches to our stated mission to “cultivate hope through learning.” We share the desire for our students to be “living letters,” bearing witness to the hope of the Gospel. We are wrestling with how we can equip our students in meaningful ways to contribute to the common good through our curricular and teaching efforts. In this presentation, we offer a framework of “Uncommon Learning for the Common Good” to address the challenges facing Christian higher education in today’s globalized world.

9:30–10:45 a.m.
Understanding Barriers to Undergraduate Participation in Local and International Service-learning Opportunities

Sarah Hyde, Social Work

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Wholeness in Family: An Overview of Parenting Programs

Selena Bueno, Psychology

Priscila Diaz, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
Youth Recovery Outcomes at 6 and 9 Months Following Participation in a Recovery Support Aftercare Pilot Study

Janna Schirmer, Psychology

Hyun (Hannah) Seo Lee, Psychology

Rachel Castaneda, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m.
1 p.m.
An Introduction to Walking Meditation

Doug Crowell, Exercise and Sport Science

Regina Trammel, Social Work

They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked to us on the road

  and opened the Scriptures to us?” (Luke 24:32).  This presentation will introduce participants to a mindfulness-   based practice known as walking meditation.  The presentation will begin with an overview of the health    promoting benefits of mindfulness-based practices.  The importance of contextualizing these types of practices    within the Christian contemplative tradition will be also be discussed and emphasized.  The experiential    learning component of the presentation will involve walking with a mindful attentiveness to each step while    contemplating a chosen sacred word or passage from scripture. Walking slowly while silently contemplating a    sacred word or passage from scripture can open our heart and mind to the presence of God in the moment.    Walking together as a group also symbolizes the communal nature of our journey in this life.

1–2:15 p.m.
Celebrating Excellence in Undergraduate Research: Winning Entries from the Eighth Annual Honors Paper Competition

David Weeks, Ph.D., Dean, Honors College

Rachel Eppley, undergraduate student, Honors Humanities and English   Charlie Layton, undergraduate student, Business:Finance

Authors of the essays published in the eighth annual honors paper competition will present their essays and engage in an open question-and-answer session with the audience. Each author receives a monetary prize toward building their personal library, and six copies of the Honors College journal, Gratia Eruditionis. 

1–2:15 p.m.
English Matters: Sigma Tau Delta Presents

Andrea Ivanov-Craig, Ph.D., Department of English

Mercedes James, undergraduate student,English

Emily Minor, undergraduate student, English

Gregory Wilburn, undergraduate student, English

Emily Wilson, undergraduate student, English

Members of Sigma Tau Delta, International English Honor Society, will present original fiction and critical work accepted for presentation at the society’s 2016 annual convention in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The audience will be invited to respond through structured small groups.

1–2:15 p.m.
Fulbright Voices: Living Letters from Around the World

Diane Guido, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Graduate Programs and Research

Aly Easton ’12, CMA Dean’s Office

Chad Richard ’12, Writing Center

Matthew Gonzalez ’10, graduate student

Come hear from three APU alumni about their experiences around the world as they taught or researched on a Fulbright grant. Learn how the grant has impacted their lives and what it was like to live abroad for a year. This is the second session of three in the “Fulbright Voices” series.

1–2:15 p.m.
How Social Media Platforms Perpetuate Discriminatory Behaviors and Racial Bias

Kristine Cody, Associate Director, Student Center for Reconciliation and Diversity

Gabrielle Lawrence-Cormier, undergraduate student, English

Keawe Alapai, undergraduate student, International Business

Crystal Reed, undergraduate student, Christian Ministries

Cole Mizel, undergraduate student, Accounting

Social media, as a congenital part of our society, has the power to define communities. This form of communication helps establish standards, trends, and rules that tell people how to behave and how to interact with their communities. This presentation will unpack the ways in which social media provide a dominant perspective of minority cultures, resulting in racial biases and discriminatory behavior in close-knit communities such as APU.  

1–2:15 p.m.
How the Bechdel Test Fails Feminism

Danica Sheean ’08, graduate student; technical director, Department of Cinematic Arts

Melanie Dosen ’08, MSW

A critique of and solution for the failures of the Bechdel-Wallace Test. 

1–2:15 p.m.
Intersection between Deaf Culture and Hearing Culture within a Communication Curriculum

 Ryan Montague, Ph.D., Department of Communication Studies

Jessica Sauceda, undergraduate student, Communication Studies

This presentation explores the struggles faced by many deaf students within hearing communication curriculum, such as the issues with receiving and sending information with others in class, their relationship and comfort level with their classmates and professor, the professor’s effort to adapt to their culture, and the overall anxiety faced within a public speaking class.

1–2:15 p.m.
Living Letters from the Past: God’s Faithfulness Discovered through Genealogical Research

 Brian Mercer, M.A., Office of Curricular Support

Nine years ago at Christmas, my father told me the story of his grandparents, which sparked an interest in/addiction to researching our family history. What I discovered was such a wonderful surprise! I found the Underground Railroad, the Mayflower, national and personal tragedies, famous and infamous characters, and so much more. That information led to a play and then a novel, but more importantly, I heard the continuing ring of God’s faithfulness to me down through the centuries. What intellectual and spiritual fruit might be hanging from your family tree? Topics for discussion will include how to get started, what to look for, and the value of family legacy

1–2:15 p.m.
No Laughing Matter: Tough Issues and Comedic Responses

 Monica Ganas, Ph.D., Department of Theater Arts

Erin Belluomini, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

Daniel Berg, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

Taylor Cole, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

Michael Donnell, undergraduate student, Acting for the Stage and Screen

Social issues seem to have become ever more difficult to discuss in public, especially when there is so much sensitivity and tension surrounding white privilege, political correctness, and related topics. The exception to this rule seems to lie in comedy. In America, comedy has become the repository for not only social and political discussion, but for public confession of every kind. This panel will explore the real issues surrounding white privilege and political correctness in our lives, and the many ways in which comics are increasingly becoming the intellectual voice of public moral argument.

1–2:15 p.m.
Sexual Assault Prevention Workshop

 Elaine Walton, Ph.D., Director, Women’s Resource Center

Al Rivera, graduate, Women’s Resource Center

Phylicia Williams, graduate student, Women’s Resource Center

Camille Corpus, undergraduate student, Women’s Resource Center

Madeline Ho, undergraduate student, Women’s Resource Center

An educational workshop that covers topics of consent, sexual assault, and bystander intervention.

1–2:15 p.m.
Studying the Long-term Effectiveness of One-on-one Counseling in Addressing Deviant Behavior among High School Students

 Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Jennifer A. Fraga, undergraduate student, Social Work

Deviant behavior has been defined as behavior that differs from the societal norm. In the case of high school students, deviant behavior can include excessive absences and physically/verbally aggressive behavior. Research has shown that one-on-one counseling among high school youth is an effective intervention to help curb and redirect such behavior. Data collected from two high schools will examine the long-term effectiveness of one-on-one counseling by comparing precounseling attendance rates and number of aggressive outbursts at school and/or home with those of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postcounseling. Findings from this study will inform professionals as to the effectiveness of counseling services in addressing deviant behavior in the high school setting. 

1–2:15 p.m.
The Compelling Nature of Love

 Kristen Girard, M.A., Department of Teacher Education

Love is revelatory and truth is endearing. Learning how to foster love for the other leads us toward truth, and living in truth creates unity in conflict and confrontation.

1–2:15 p.m.
The Heart of Hospice Letting Patients Finish Their Letter Well: Satisfaction of Hospice Services at a Local Agency Based on Leve

 Anupama Jacob, Ph.D., Department of Social Work

Julie Brink, undergraduate student, Social Work

A number of factors influence the level of satisfaction with hospice services among families with a loved one in hospice. One such factor is the education the hospice team provides about medicine and expectations of hospice to families as they navigate hospice services. Drawing on data collected from a hospice agency, this research examines if there is a correlation between level of education provided to families and their level of satisfaction with hospice services. Further, this research examines if the level of satisfaction with hospice services varies based on caregivers’ primary language. Findings from the study will help the hospice agency develop education programs to promote services and education that is more culturally sensitive for all patients and families. The findings will also help the agency evaluate whether additional education resources for families whose primary language is not English need to be developed. 

1–2:15 p.m.
The Road to Retirement

Dennette Miramontes, Office of University Advancement

Kevin Kurimoto ’02, The Legend Group
Kevin Webb ’88, Thrivant Financial
Adam Bott ’06, Edward Jones
Terrance Meyer

Navigating the preretirement decisions regarding income, Social Security, long-term care, and more. 

1–2:15 p.m.
Unlocking Your Potential: Keys to Successful Note Taking and Study Skills

 Christine D. Reyes, M.A., Office of the Graduate Registrar

Want to learn how to create and take effective notes in the classroom and from textbooks? Need to find a way to make studying for exams and quizzes easier? More organized? This short presentation will show students how to dissect terms, text, and diagrams by what they do and do not know in order to help make their studying efforts “smarter, not harder.”

1–2:15 p.m.
Urban Ministry: ‘Seeking the Welfare of the City’

Kevin Young, M.Div., L.A. Theology Coordinator and Adjunct Professor, Azusa Pacific Seminary

Michael A. Mata, M.Div., Director, MATUL Los Angeles Track, Azusa Pacific Seminary

Gregg Moder, D.Min., Department of Practical Theology

Colleen Livermore, Center for Vocational Ministry, Department of Practical Theology

What does it mean to “seek the welfare of the city” (Jer. 29:7) in an urban context? What does it mean to be a church that lives out what it says it believes, seeking the shalom of a city? Interact with panelists on the frontlines of urban ministry in their communities who are also key undergraduate and seminary faculty at Azusa Pacific. Through such avenues as community transformation, youth leadership development, public health, education, prayer, intercultural outreach, service, and reform, these leaders and educators are leading others to serve where God is calling them. Listen, learn, and interact with these “living letters” and catalytic regional leaders committed to seeing “God’s Kingdom come” in their communities from the church and nonprofit perspectives. This panel is sponsored by APU’s Center for Vocational Ministry, which mentors and equips students for ministry

1–2:15 p.m.
Win-Win Planning for High Taxation

Dennette Miramontes, Office of University Advancement
Randy Huston ’75, Yellowstone Trust Administration

This presentation examines why the charitable lead trust is today’s great tax problem-solving tool, and strategies for exiting real estate.

1–2:15 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
Composing Our Lives: Words, Art, and Transformation

 David D. Esselstrom, Ph.D., Department of English

Every writer knows that the person who ends a work, whether novelist or college essay writer, is profoundly different from the one who began it. Yes, actions speak louder than words, but the action of putting words on paper or screen or canvas shapes and defines the one who does so. We are not only in the process of discovering who we are—or claim to be—but also where we stand in a cosmos that seemingly embraces or shuns us.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Diversity and the Voice of an Ally

 Kristine Cody, Associate Director, Student Center for Reconciliation and Diversity

Keren Cabrera, undergraduate student, Psychology

Mandy Chin, undergraduate student, Business Management

Hannah Bournes, undergraduate student, Psychology

Brandt Mabuni, undergraduate student, International Business

Progress in American culture’s racial reconciliation will never occur without an approach that is more unified among its social and ethnic groups. Our focus will be to explain the ways in which majority culture’s perspective is invaluable in the fight for social justice, and why a healthy understanding of, and integration with, minority perspectives is needed to turn the fight away from each other and take an allied stance against systemic racism.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Easy Breezy or Fast and Furious: Evidence-based Strategies Shown to Improve Your Fitness

 Paul Saville, Ph.D., CSCS, Department of Exercise and Sport Science

William Wilkinson, MD, Department of Exercise and Sport Science

The leaders will introduce two evidence-based strategies shown to be effective for improving health and physical fitness of students, staff, and faculty in the midst of a busy semester (e.g., limiting sedentary time and utilizing high-intensity interval training). They will also introduce attendees to some of the tools needed to adopt and maintain regular exercise. If time permits, they will also lead attendees in creating an individualized HIIT program that will allow them to gain ground on their fitness goals without making them late for class!

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Fact or Fiction: When the Truth Stops Mattering

 Monica Ganas, Ph.D., Department of Theater Arts

Marissa Brown, undergraduate student, Acting for the Stage and Screen

Maryanne Burr, undergraduate student, Acting for the Stage and Screen

Alison Johnson, undergraduate student, Business/Theater Arts

Matt Tyrell, undergraduate student, Theater Arts

The words “fact” and “fiction” share the same Latin root word, facere. This is why some languages use the same word for the verb “to do” and the verb “to make.” It is as though we intuit that the things done in the world are intrinsically tied to what we make of what has been done. In this way, we are all natural storytellers, but when technology is involved, those stories can have great impact. The stories told in the entertainment industry, particularly, influence what we believe to be true, regardless of the facts. This panel will explore the fictionalization of Christians, history, women, and more in an arena that is the source of “truth” for many.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Flourishing in Ministry: The Relationships Pastors Need to Cultivate Resilience in Ministry

Chris Adams, Ph.D., Director, Center for Vocational Ministry

The Flourishing in Ministry study is a Lilly-funded research project based out of the University of Notre Dame. Focused on the well-being of clergy and their families, Flourishing in Ministry examines what motivates pastors and priests to be engaged in ministry and what disrupts them from experiencing well-being in their work. In our research, we attempt to explore how clergy, often working with lean resources, can give so much to others and experience a sense of fulfillment and growth in their daily work lives.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Fulbright Voices: Envision Yourself as a Living Letter

 Diane Guido, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Graduate Programs and Research

John Simons, DMA, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, College of Music and the Arts

Aly Easton ’12, CMA Dean’s Office

Chad Richard ’12, Writing Center

Matthew Gonzalez ’10, graduate student

Craig Goodworth, MFA ’10

Are you ready to immerse yourself in a foreign country, pursue academic excellence, and experience a lifechanging year? Get advice from panelists—APU alumni who received Fulbright grants—so you, too, can be a “living letter.” This is the third session of three in the “Fulbright Voices” series.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Is This a Real Letter? Recognizing Online Threats

Shawn Kohrman, Information and Media Technology

Holly Magnuson, M.A., Information and Media Technology

Join us as we discuss your personal security and well-being in light of today’s cyber threats. We will explore common tricks and tactics used to obtain your critical information, along with ways to ensure you are protected online.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Letters Under Review: Learning to Integrate the Painful Parts of Our Lives into Our Stories

 Bill Fiala, Ph.D., University Counseling Center

Andrea Canales, M.A., University Counseling Center

Nathaniel Fernandez, M.A., University Counseling Center

Fabienne Leaf, M.A., University Counseling Center

Brianna Bleeker, M.A., University Counseling Center

Andy Ying, M.A., University Counseling Center

Do you feel like you often have to act like everything is okay when really you are struggling on the inside? Would you like to feel more known and understand how to share more deeply with those close to you about your real journey? Come to this interactive workshop where you can discover how to share your “life letter”/personal journey in a more fulfilling way that leads to greater peace within and more authentic relationships.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Moving Toward Wellness and Flourishing in Your Family: Tapping the Wisdom of Genogram Science to Promote Family Intimacy

 Stephen Lambert, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

Robert Linsalato, M.A., Department of Psychology

Genogram science can be used to detect simple, obvious factors in family health, such as the impact of marital tension on children. Genogram science can also be used to detect subtler matters in personality and character development. This presentation explains simple and subtler, more nuanced meaning in genograms to promote family wellness and flourishing. An example of a simple use of genograms is discussing how a parent who is a problem drinker may affect a family. A more subtle and nuanced use of genograms is helping individuals, couples, and families realize how masculinization and feminization processes in children may be influencing and being influenced by parental conceptions of gender roles, leading to the children’s eventual selection of spouses that promote either symmetrical or complementary marital arrangements. Time will be permitted for a basic group activity involving the construction of genograms.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Pastiche, Venganza Haitiana, Magia, Merengue y Trujillato en la Novela El Hombre del Acordeón de Marcio Veloz Maggiolo

 Juan B. Guerrero, Ph.D., Department of Modern Languages

In 1973, Dominican novelist Freddy Prestol Castillo published The Massacre Passes on Foot, which describes the frightful Haitian slaughter. In 2003, another Dominican writer, Marcio Veloz Maggiolo, published The Man of the Accordion, in which he uses pastiche to describe how the Haitians’ wish for revenge takes place through the life of the main character of Maggiolo’s novel, Mr. Honorio Lora, a Dominican who loved Haitians.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Portrayals of Sexual Assault and Rape in Television and Film

Danica Sheean ’08, graduate student; technical director, Department of Cinematic Arts

Hannah Hardbottle, undergraduate student, Cinematic Arts

Maggie McCall, undergraduate student, Cinematic Arts

Presentation of research findings on inaccuracies of portrayals.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
The Literary Process: Readings and Panel from Westwind Literary Journal

Christine Kern, Ph.D., Department of English

Tom Allbaugh, Ph.D., Department of English

Alain Julian Leon, undergraduate student, English/Philosophy

Fiction writers, poets, and creative-nonfiction writers read from their works and discuss their writing processes.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
The Penguin in Our Pew

 Brian Monroe, Information and Media Technology

This presentation looks at software through the lenses of social justice and theology, and discusses why the Church needs to be at the forefront of OpenSource. Though software can be a technical subject, this presentation is not technical, but rather focuses on the philosophical framework to carry our theology and use of technology. Attendees will receive a gift.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
The Shema as Halakhah: A Way of Living

 Mike DeVries, Ph.D., Department of Biblical and Religious Studies

Throughout the ages, the Shema (Deut. 6:4-9) has been a central prayer and proclamation in Jewish thought. Declaring exclusive allegiance to YHWH, the Shema called upon the people to “love YHWH your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your might.” More than mere platitude, this call to allegiance deeply influenced Jewish halakhah—the way of living—through the ages. This session will explore the ancient Near Eastern setting of this proclamation, as well as the role it has played in Jewish belief and halakhic practice through the ages. Our goal is to bring into focus how this central prayer and proclamation intersects with our lives today, forming a guiding vision for how we should live.

2:30–3:45 p.m.
They Will Know Our Hearts When We Listen to Their Voices

Catherine Heinlein, Ph.D., School of Nursing

Chino Ortiz, undergraduate student, Applied Exercise Science

Valerie Chao, undergraduate student, Applied Exercise Science

Ariana Wagoner, undergraduate student, Honors Humanities

The Cultural Aspects of Food and Nutrition course offered under the minor in nutrition has given students and faculty a look into the many errors of our own ways when approaching someone of a different cultural background. To better appreciate the worldview of our neighbor(s), students prepared foods from a number of countries around the globe, and learned the meaning of foodways, religion, traditional health beliefs and practices, and the therapeutic uses of foods in a given culture. As people migrate to the United States, or take on a Westernized diet in their own country, the health implications have been striking. This presentation aims to provide the audience a brief look into the worldview of others to better understand the challenges one may face in a rapidly developing world. Will the loss of important traditions among cultures create chaos in more ways than we had imagined?

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Wills, Trusts, and Estate Tax Planning

 Dennette Miramontes, Office of University Advancement

Jonathan Hawell ’74, Estate Attorney

Dennis Beckwith, Office of University Advancement

This presentation examines key questions about estate planning: Should I have a will or a living trust? How can I be a good trustee? How can I best care for those I leave behind?

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Working for Justice in a Globalized World

Michael A. Mata, M.Div., Director, MATUL Los Angeles Track, Azusa Pacific Seminary 

In many ways the world is shrinking and opportunities abound—information is transmitted in nanoseconds, hypermobility brings us into constant contact with a kaleidoscopic world, and those with resources can access nearly anything they desire. Yet billions live on the edge of survival without access to opportunities, even in the richest country in the world. What is our response as people of faith in the midst of such exclusion and injustice? We will explore how to live our faith beyond charity or fish-giving to transformation and stewardship, so that every community has access to the pond.

2:30–3:45 p.m.