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All financial aid is subject to the continued availability of federal, state, institutional, and private funding. Budget limitations may reduce or eliminate any of the awards described without notice.

Deadlines

Fall Semester Financial Aid Document Priority Deadline: April 30, 2011

Verification Worksheet, Signed 2010 1040s and W-2s (student and parent Federal tax forms), other forms (as requested)

Fall Semester Admissions File Document Priority Deadline: July 30, 2011
Most often a final/official transcript

Spring Semester Priority Deadline: November 30, 2011
Financial Aid and Admissions File Documents (for students admitted to APU for the spring semester)

What happens if a student misses the Priority Deadline?
APU reserves the right to cancel a student’s financial aid at any time and will do so if the student’s Admissions File and/or Financial Aid file is not complete prior to the first day of the semester.

Can a student be reevaluated for financial aid eligibility if the student missed the priority deadline(s)?
Yes, if the student has submitted all of the financial aid and admissions file documents requested prior to the student’s last date of enrollment for the semester. APU does not guarantee any of the aid previously offered will still be available.

If a student fails to complete his/her financial aid and/or admissions file prior to ceasing enrollment for that semester, the student will not be eligible to receive financial aid. The student will be responsible for any owing balance that remains on his or her APU student account.

Admissions File

To be eligible for financial aid within a given semester, the student must be fully admitted to the university. The final steps of admission often include the submission of complete/official transcripts. All requested admissions documents (including transcripts) must be received by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions by the student’s last date of enrollment within that semester. A student who does not complete his/her admissions file by the last day of the semester (or the student’s last date of enrollment for that semester) will not be eligible for financial aid for that semester.

FAFSA

To be eligible for federal, state, and institutional need-based financial aid within a given semester, the appropriate year’s FAFSA must be accurately completed (including necessary signatures/e-signatures) and electronically received from the federal government by Undergraduate SFS in enough time to process prior to the student’s last date of enrollment. For most students, this is at least four weeks prior to the student’s last date of enrollment.

Completing the FAFSA is the first step in applying for federal, state, and institutional need-based aid. Please also review the ‘Loans’ and ‘Financial Aid File/Paperwork’ deadlines below to ensure that all necessary steps are completed to be eligible for aid in a given semester.

Financial Aid File/Paperwork

To be eligible for financial aid within a given semester, all requested paperwork (tax forms, forms, etc.) must be accurately completed and received by Undergraduate SFS by the student’s last date of enrollment. For most students who attend the entire school year, this is the last day of the spring semester. But if the student ceases attendance, the deadline to submit all completed paperwork would be the last day of the semester he/she did attend.

Loans

To be eligible for loans in a given semester, a student must complete the application process by the student’s last date of enrollment (specifically, but not limited to ‘accepting’ the student loan(s) via home.apu.edu). Similarly, for a student to be eligible for a Parent PLUS loan, the PLUS loan application steps must be completed by the student’s last date of enrollment. Although a majority of the loan process can be completed online, please do not wait until the last moment. Should the student’s loans not process by the last date of enrollment, the student will be responsible for any owing balance on his or her APU account.

Financial Aid Packaging

Azusa Pacific University offers financial aid in the form grants, scholarships, loans, and employment. In order to serve the large number of students needing financial assistance, the university coordinates various elements of each student’s financial aid program. This ‘packaging’ approach may include assistance from two or more sources of financial aid. The university’s goal is to award all applicants the maximum scholarship, grant, loan, and work study for which they qualify, within the restrictions of federal and state guidelines and institutional policies.

Financial Aid Policy for International, Study Abroad, and Off-campus Programs

Students participating in international and off-campus education programs approved by Azusa Pacific University (i.e., programs sponsored by APU, such as the South Africa and Oxford programs, or the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities [CCCU]) during either the fall or spring semester:

A faculty-staff tuition discount and one tuition exchange benefit can be awarded each semester for international and domestic off-campus programs, including Oxford and CCCU sponsored programs (L.A. Term and High Sierra Great Works programs are not included in this limitation). A total of three faculty/staff or tuition exchange benefits is awarded each semester for the Azusa South Africa semester. The selection will be determined in order by (1) academic merit: cumulative GPA and academic major; (2) academic rank: first semester senior, then second semester junior, etc.; and (3) tenure of faculty/staff employment at the university.

At this time, no institutional aid will be provided by APU for other APU approved programs or other international programs approved by the Center for Global Learning & Engagement. Federal, state, and other outside scholarship or fellowship funding will be available for these programs approved by the Center for Global Learning & Engagement. Since international programs sponsored or approved by Azusa Pacific University for student participation during the interterm and summer are developed specifically with the intent to assist students in supplementing and enriching their standard fall and spring semester education, and there is typically no financial aid available to assist with the cost of travel, the tuition is reduced to one-half of the standard summer school charge, except for programs where the tuition is higher than at APU, in which case the program’s tuition will be charged.

All students participating in international educational study programs and registered through APU will be charged the additional International Health Fee. Students participating in study abroad programs which are not sponsored or approved by either Azusa Pacific University or the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities will not be eligible to receive their federal, state, or institutional aid.

Keeping in Touch

The university will attempt to inform students about deadlines and procedures, but the final responsibility for the timely filing of the FAFSA and related documents is the student’s.

The student must notify Undergraduate Student Financial Services regarding changes in financial situation, marriage, loss of a job, change in class load, withdrawal from school, or change of address. In order to contact Undergraduate Student Financial Services, a student may write, call, or come in person.

Loan Code of Conduct

As a part of the Program Participation Agreement for participating in Title IV financial aid programs, institutions are required to develop and comply with a loan code of conduct that prohibits conflicts of interest for financial aid personnel with respect to all student loans. Any Azusa Pacific University financial aid officer or employee who has responsibilities with respect to student educational loans must annually be reminded to comply with this code of conduct. The following provisions bring Azusa Pacific University into compliance with the federal law [CFR 34 601.21 and HEOA 487].

  1. Neither Azusa Pacific University as an institution nor any individual financial aid officer or financial aid employee shall enter into any revenue-sharing arrangement with any lender which makes loans to students attending the institution.
  2. No financial aid officer or financial aid employee of Azusa Pacific University who has responsibilities with respect to education loans, or any of his/her family members, shall solicit or accept any gift from a lender, guarantor, or servicer of education loans.
    • For purposes of this prohibition, the term “gift” means any gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, hospitality, loan, or other item having a monetary value of more than nominal.
    • Gifts and favorable terms and benefits do not include a brochure, workshop or training using standard materials relating to a loan, default aversion, or financial literacy, such as a part of a training session, entrance and exit counseling, as long as the institution’s staff are in control of the counseling and the counseling does not promote the services of a specific lender.
  3. A financial aid officer or employee at Azusa Pacific University who has responsibilities with respect to education loans shall not accept from any lender (or affiliate of any lender) any fee, payment, or other financial benefit (including the opportunity to purchase stock) as compensation for any type of consulting arrangement or other contract to provide services to a lender or on behalf of a lender relating to education loans.
  4. Azusa Pacific University shall not:
    • assign a lender to a first-time borrower through award packaging or any other method; or
    • refuse to certify or delay certification of any loan based on the borrower’s selection of a particular lender or guaranty agency.
  5. Azusa Pacific University shall not request or accept from any lender any offer of funds to be used for private education loans, including funds for an opportunity pool loan, to students in exchange for the institution providing concessions or promises regarding providing the lender with a specific loan volume of such loans, or a preferred lender arrangement for such loans. An “opportunity pool loan” is defined as a private education loan made by a lender to a student (or the student’s family) that involves a payment by the institution to the lender for extending credit to the student.
  6. Azusa Pacific University shall not request or accept from any lender any assistance with call center staffing or financial aid office staffing.
  7. Any financial aid office employee who has any responsibilities with respect to education loans or other student financial aid, and who serves on an advisory board, commission, or group established by a lender, guarantor, or group of lenders or guarantors, shall be prohibited from receiving anything of value from the lender, guarantor, or group of lenders or guarantors, except that the employee may be reimbursed for reasonable expenses incurred in serving on such an advisory board, commission, or group.

Minimum Enrollment

Award amounts are based on a full–time academic load of at least 12 units per semester at APU.

Nondiscrimination

Undergraduate Student Financial Services does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures.

Refund Policy and Withdrawal Information

We realize that outside circumstances may sometimes impact a student’s ability to complete the semester. After the add/drop period, when a student stops attending all of his or her classes during the semester, depending on the circumstances, it may be classified as a “withdrawal,” “leave of absence,” or “dismissal” from the university. For the purpose of charges assessed and financial aid eligibility listed below, a leave of absence and a dismissal will be handled the same as a withdrawal from the university.

Official Process: Withdrawal or Leave of Absence

Contact the Office of the Associate Dean of Students. Before ceasing attendance during the semester, we advise students to consider how much they might be charged and how much financial aid they might receive.

Withdrawing Prior to the 60 Percent Point in the Semester

If a student drops a class during the add/drop period, no tuition will be charged for that class. After add/drop, if a student withdraws from one or a few classes, but is still attending other classes, the student will be charged tuition for all of his or her classes (including the withdrawals). However, in the event a student withdraws from all of his or her classes after the add/drop period, charges and financial aid will be calculated as follows:

Charges

Tuition: Prorated per day
Fees: Not refundable
Room: Proration set forth in the housing contract
Board: Prorated weekly, based on the 15 week semester

Financial Aid
Institutional Aid

Prorated per day (assuming the student has completed everything required, and his or her admission file and financial aid file are complete prior to the last date of attendance).

State Aid

Cal Grant Award: Prorated per day (assuming the student has completed everything required, and his or her admission file and financial aid file are complete prior to the last date of attendance). Will not be used to reimburse the federal government. If applicable, will be returned to CSAC prior to all other awards, other than Return to Title IV funds. Student understands that receipt of prorated amount will use an entire semester’s worth of Cal Grant eligibility.

Cal Grant B Access/Subsistence Award: If the student withdraws after the add/drop period, the student will receive the full award amount for the semester.

Withdrawing On or After the 60 Percent Point in the Semester

Charges

The student will be charged in full.

Financial Aid

The student will receive full financial aid (assuming the student has completed everything required, and his or her admission file and financial aid file are complete prior to the last date of attendance).

The Federal Government’s “Return to Title IV” (R2T4) Policy

If a student withdraws from all courses in a traditional 15 week semester, or doesn’t complete all the sessions of a modular (sequential) course schedule, in some cases the student only earns a portion of the financial aid already received. APU is required by federal law to use a prescribed formula to calculate the unearned portion of the financial aid received and return it to the federal government’s Title IV programs.

Traditional 15-Week Semester R2T4 Policy

The percentage of Title IV financial aid earned is determined by dividing the number of days the student completed in the semester, by the total number of days in the term. If the student attended 60 percent or more of the days in the semester, the student can keep all of the aid originally received. If less than 60 percent, the government determines how much Title IV aid the student earned (the percentage multiplied by the total amount of Title IV aid received).

Example

If there were 109 total days in the semester and the student completed 54 days, the student would earn 49.5 percent of the Title IV aid received (54/109 = 49.5%).

In our example, the student originally received the following federal awards for the semester:

Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan $3,484.00
Subsidized Direct Stafford Loan $2,737.00
Pell Grant $1,250.00
Total Federal Aid $7,471.00

Per the government’s formula, the student earned $3,698 (49.5% x $7,471 = $3,698):

Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan $0.00
Subsidized Direct Stafford Loan $2,448.00
Pell Grant $1,250.00
Total Federal Aid Earned $3,698.00

Next, we need to determine the amount of aid that needs to be returned to the Title IV programs (total federal aid originally received minus aid earned).

Total Federal Aid Originally Received $7,471.00
Total Federal Aid Earned -$3,698.00
Total Federal Aid to be Returned $3,773.00

The student is responsible for any owing balance this may cause on the student’s APU account.

Treatment of Unofficial Withdrawals

If a student fails to officially withdraw, and receives a combination of all “F’s,” “FN’s,” “IN’s” and “NC’s” as grades for the semester, the Department of Education considers the student to have unofficially withdrawn from classes. APU is required to investigate and determine when the student actually last attended class and then perform the required R2T4 calculation. If the date of withdrawal cannot be confirmed, the R2T4 calculation is done using a 50% completion rate. This process is usually completed well after the end of the semester, once grades are submitted.

Students Making Class Changes

Students may add and/or drop classes until the last day to change registration. This date is listed on the academic calendar.

Release of Records

It is understood that by applying for financial aid, the student grants Undergraduate Student Financial Services the right to release the student’s grades and enrollment records to scholarship, state, federal, and loan agencies as needed.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Students who wish to receive financial aid must be in good academic standing and make satisfactory academic progress towards a degree or certificate program in addition to meeting other eligibility criteria.

Undergraduate students are evaluated at the end of each semester (fall, spring, and summer).

Minimum Requirements

The following minimum academic standards must be met to be eligible to receive federal aid, state aid, institutional aid, and most types alternative/private education loans:

Qualitative Measure (GPA Requirement)

Undergraduate students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0.

Quantitative Measure (Pace Requirement)

Undergraduate students must complete 67 percent (just over two-thirds) of all units in which they originally enroll from the time of first attendance. Example: A first-term undergraduate student who originally enrolls in 12 units, withdraws from 3 units, and successfully completes the remaining 9 units, would meet the quantitative measure requirement since the student passed at least 67 percent of the units in which he or she originally enrolled (9/12 = 75%).

Time Limit for Receiving Financial Aid (Maximum Time Frame)

An undergraduate student may be eligible for financial aid up until the 189th unit attempt. Once the student attempts 190 units, he or she will no longer be eligible to receive financial aid. All attempted units will count toward this maximum time frame (including repeated courses).

Definitions

Change of Major

If a student changes his or her major, it will not “reset” the current qualitative (GPA) or quantitative (pace) measures of SAP. All units attempted and/or passed will be counted when determining if a student meets the minimum requirements listed above.

Financial Aid SAP Statuses

Students who fail to maintain SAP will be placed on Financial Aid Warning and will be given one term of financial aid eligibility to correct their SAP deficiencies. If the student does not make up their deficiencies in that one term, they will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension and will be ineligible for all financial aid (federal, state, and institutional). Finally, if a student appeals and is approved, they will be placed on Financial Aid Probation.

Grades

The only grades that meet satisfactory academic progress completion standards are grades for which credit is awarded; A, B, C, D, P, and CR. (Please note that some departments and/or schools require a higher minimum GPA in order for coursework to meet their program requirements.) Withdrawal and incomplete grades are not passing grades. Challenge exams and audited courses are not considered.

Regaining Eligibility

Student regains financial aid eligibility when they meet all three measures of progress for SAP. It is possible for students to be placed on a warning status multiple times in their undergraduate academic career.

Remedial Coursework

A student may take one academic year’s worth of remedial courses for financial aid. Remedial coursework for students who are admitted into an eligible program and take it within that program will be counted toward all three progress measures for SAP.

Repeated Courses

If a student repeats a failed or a previously passed class, it will replace the grade to recalculate into the new cumulative GPA. The units will still count toward the completion rate and maximum time frame. Students who passed a class and chooses to repeat for a higher grade may receive financial aid only once for that repeated class. Students may receive financial aid for a failed class that they repeat until they pass (as long as they are meeting all of the other SAP requirements).

Transfer Credits

Transfer credits that have been officially accepted to complete program requirements will count for qualitative (GPA requirement) and quantitative (pace requirement) measures of Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Appeals

Students may appeal for reinstatement of financial aid if they, a spouse, a dependent child, or a parent have experienced illness that prevented class attendance for an extended period of time; they experienced a death in the immediate family (parents, siblings, spouse, or dependent children); or they have experienced some extraordinary situation that prevented them from meeting the minimum standards. Such a situation must be exceptional and nonrecurring in nature. The appeal for reinstatement must explain the cause of the academic difficulty and how the situation has been resolved.

A SAP Appeal form is available online and in the Office of Undergraduate Student Financial Services and it must be submitted within 30 days of notification of financial aid ineligibility. The student must develop an academic plan if they cannot meet SAP within one term of probation. The academic plan that is submitted with the appeal should be created by the student and the academic advising staff or academic department representative. The appeal will be reviewed by a Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals Committee.

Stacking Financial Aid

Financial Aid Stacking Policy 2012–13

The Office of Undergraduate Student Financial Services strives to award all applicants the maximum grant, scholarship, loan, and work study aid for which they qualify. Unfortunately, sometimes federal, state, and/or institutional guidelines may restrict the total amount or type of award a student may receive.

Aid will be stacked in the following order (unless otherwise stated):

The following guidelines are provided in an effort to help explain why a student’s financial aid may be reduced.

Step 1 – Cost of Attendance (COA)

Question: Can a student’s aid exceed his/her Cost of Attendance (COA)?

Answer: No.

Exceptions which may sometimes exceed COA: ROTC and Veteran’s Benefits

Step 2 – Cal Grant

Question: What if a student has a Cal Grant as part of their financial aid award?

Answer: Per CSAC policy: “Total grant aid along with the Cal Grant cannot exceed NEED.”

Definitions: “Grant aid” is any free money award. “Need” = COA minus EFC (Expected Family Contribution)

Step 3 – Institutional Aid Can Stack Up to Tuition

Definition: “Institutional aid” includes scholarships, grants, and awards from APU; as well as Faculty/Staff and Tuition Exchange awards.

Question: How much can institutional aid stack up to?

Answer: $30,236/year; $15,118 per semester

Exceptions which can stack above $15,118 per semester (unless restricted by the other Stacking Policy steps):

  1. Athletic Scholarships, which can stack up to the designated Grant-in-Aid amount
  2. Resident Advisor (RA) Scholarships
  3. Other rare exceptions may be granted by the director of undergraduate student financial services upon petition.

Restrictions which may limit the amount to under $15,118 per semester: See steps 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9.

Step 4 – APU Grant

Question: When will APU Grant eligibility be re-evaluated or removed?

Answer: A student’s APU Grant can be re-evaluated whenever new information is received, but typically a change will only occur when the student’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC) changes.

Restrictions which may reduce or eliminate the APU Grant: See steps 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9.

Step 5 – High Desert Nursing Scholarship

Question:  How much institutional aid will a High Desert Nursing student receive?

Answer: High Desert Nursing students are awarded the HD Nursing Scholarship, up to $11,200 if full time ($5,600/fall and $5,600/spring; no scholarship in summer). Award amount will be prorated if enrolled less than full time (9–11 units at 75 percent, 6–8 units at 50 percent).

What aid will be eliminated: Other institutional aid. The only institutional aid offered to students in the Two-Plus-Two (High Desert) nursing program is the HD Nursing Scholarship.

Restrictions which may reduce or eliminate the HD Nursing Scholarship: See steps 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9.

Step 6 – MESTAD

Question: What is the amount of the MESTAD award?

Answer: The amount is determined by the MESTAD Scholarship Committee.

Restrictions which may limit the amount and/or reduce some of the award: See steps 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Step 7 – Bishop Dixon Scholarship

Question: What does the Bishop Dixon Scholarship cover?

Answer: The remaining amount of the following charges on the Bishop Dixon recipient’s APU student account that is not already covered by federal, state, and institutional aid: tuition, room, board, university services fee, health fee, parking fee, music fee, science lab fee, other mandatory fees, and up to $1,250/year ($625/semester) towards books and supplies.

Order of stacking: Federal, state, institutional aid; then the Bishop Dixon Scholarship will cover the difference.

Restrictions which may limit the amount and/or reduce some of the awards: See steps 1 and 2.

Step 8 – ROTC

Question: What aid will an ARMY ROTC student generally receive? (Air Force: amounts vary; check with an AF representative.)

Answer:
ARMY ROTC Scholarship up to $31,076 per year ($15,538 per semester);
ROTC Room and Board Scholarship up to $8,000 per year ($4,000 per semester)

Definitions:
ARMY ROTC Scholarship is paid by the government.
The ROTC Room and Board Scholarship is a scholarship from APU to help cover on-campus housing and a meal plan.

What aid will be eliminated: Other Institutional aid. The only Institutional aid offered is the ROTC Room and Board Scholarship.

Step 9 – APU Post 9/11 Yellow Ribbon Award

Question: How much institutional aid will a Yellow Ribbon student generally receive?

Answer: For the 2012–13 school year, up to $14,000 per year in an APU Yellow Ribbon Award (amount may vary depending on enrollment and charges).

What aid will be eliminated: Other institutional aid. By applying to participate in APU’s Yellow Ribbon program, the student declines all other forms of institutional aid (APU scholarships, grants, awards; including the faculty/staff education award and tuition exchange).

What if a student drops or withdraws from a class after add/drop? The GI Bill will not pay for those units. The student will be responsible for the outstanding charges or any outstanding debt owed to the VA and/or to APU.

Verification

Each year, the federal government randomly chooses about 30 percent of all FAFSA applications for a process that’s called ‘verification.’ The law requires colleges to obtain information from the family that confirms the accuracy of the information that was reported on the FAFSA (e.g. signed tax forms, verification worksheets, etc.).

Beyond those applications selected for verification, the law requires colleges to also request further documentation when a FAFSA application and/or subsequent paperwork appears incomplete or inaccurate.

A student is not eligible to receive federal, state, and/or institutional need-based aid until all required paperwork has been submitted. We realize that these requests may sometimes seem a bit intrusive, but APU is merely following the requirements set forth in the law.